WHAT ARE SOCIAL INNOVATIONS GRANTS?

Tulsa Area United Way Social Innovations Grants encourage the creation of bold new solutions for improving education, health/basic needs and financial mobility. The program provides nonprofits with the critical resources—including funding, mentorship and community connections—to accelerate the growth and stability of their innovative programs.

At Tulsa Area United Way, we recognize that getting a new nonprofit program off the ground can be incredibly challenging. The Social Innovations Grant is just one of the ways we support nonprofit innovators, enabling new or existing nonprofit organizations to access the resources and connections they need to scale their programs and achieve success.

Social Innovations Grants
Recipients Announced!

Congratulations to our 8 finalists chosen from 16 semi-finalists. Learn more about the Pitch Event finalists by clicking here.

2023 SOCIAL INNOVATIONS GRANT FUNDING

The 2023 Social Innovation grant deadline for mini-applications has closed.

If you would like to be notified when the grant cycle opens again or to receive other information about TAUW or resources related to innovation and nonprofits, please fill out this form. Your email will be added to the appropriate email list(s).

Social Innovations Grant History

Below you will find TAUW’s historical investments in Social Innovations Grants, which were originally known as Venture Grants.

2013/2014 Venture Grants

· Family & Children’s Services – $48,000

· Goodwill Industries – $52,000

· Mental Health Association – $100,000

TOTAL: $200,000.

2014 Innovation Grants

· Family Safety Center – $65,000

· Fab Lab – $60,000

· Workforce Tulsa – $50,000

· Youth Services of Tulsa – $90,000

· Mary Ogle, A New Leaf – $5,000

· Mary Isaacson, OU-Tulsa – $5,000

· Amberleigh Jewart, CSC, – $4,000

· Karen Smith, CSC – $2,500

· Michael Baker, TFD – $5,000

· Ross Faith, TCF – $5,000

· Noah Stout, TFA – $5,000

· Nancy McDonald, YMCA – $5,000

TOTAL: $311,500.

2015 Innovation Grants

· Madison Strategies Group – $50,000

· Family & Children’s Services – $50,000

· Resonance Center for Women – $50,000

· Youth Services of Tulsa – $99,404

· Maria Fedore , TFA – $5,000

· Betty Fulk, TSHA – $2,345

· Sarah Thomas, Attic Conversations Yoga Foundation, $4,160

Grand Total: $260,909

2016 Innovations Grants

· DVIS-$40,000

· 36 Degrees N-$50,000

· Coffee Bunker-$50,000

· Campaign (MODUS)-$50,000

· Gatesway-$25,000

· New View-$25,000

· Alisa Bell, JAMES, Inc-$5,000

Grand total: $245,000

2017 Innovation Grants

· 1st Step Male Diversion Program $71,250

· Youth WorkAdvance $80,000

· Mental Health Program/A Better Way $61,750

· Caring Community Friends-Bookmobile/Snack $37,000

Total $250,000

2018 Innovation Financial Stability RFP

CEO-Economic Opportunity Initiative $85,000

Legal Aid Services-Landlord Tenant Mediation $60,000

Tulsa Community Workadvance-Due North $100,000

Tulsa Community Workadvance-Finance Advance $50,500

Total $295,500

2019 Innovations

Innovations Fab Lab-Match: $25,000

Family and Children’s Services-COPES 911: $67,122

Growing Together-Leadership Program $52,860

Tulsa Advocates for Protection of Children-Mobile resource: $80,000

MetCares-Program Scholarships: $75,000

Total $299,982

2020 Healthcare RFP

CURA medical clinic: $15,000

Urban Strategies: $60,000

DVIS: $100,000

Center for Housing Solutions: $115,465

South Tulsa Community House: $34,535

Total $325,000

2021 Innovations

Be Heard: $100,000

Black Wall Street Chamber of Commerce Job Training Program: $50,000

Modus Delivers: $35,000

The Oasis Project – Double Up Oklahoma: $30,000 *Additional $70k from Ascension St. John

YWCA – Carmela Hill Legacy Fund: $35,000

Total with Matching Dollars: $320,000

TAUW Investment: $250,000

2022 Innovations

In 2022, TAUW received ARPA dollars through Tulsa County. Combined with additional resources, TAUW awarded more than $300,000 to local partners to launch the Tulsa County Food Insecurity Collaborative Plan. The Plan works in three distinct areas to address food insecurity: 1) data technology to assess distribution and need of emergency food resources; 2) feasibility study to analyze systems to build more equitable access to healthy and affordable food; and, 3) improved technology to expand SNAP enrollment.